Author Topic: The Name of the Wind  (Read 900 times)

Offline Aimless

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The Name of the Wind
« on: October 10, 2007, 06:42:47 pm »
Surely I can't be the only one on FF who's read this book???

If I've ever given you any reason to trust me and my taste, please google for "rothfuss review" and "rothfuss interview" and check a few of the sensible-looking hits out.

For example: http://www.patrickrothfuss.com/content/reviews.asp


I'd put the book down after a few hundred pages because some other things got in the way, but after I picked up again I was essentially unable to leave it. I read the remaining like 700 pages in more or less one sitting, staying up till past 4 AM to finish--something I haven't done in YEARS, I think. It was just that good.

I can't compare it to Erikson, or Martin, or Jordan. The most obvious comparison is to Robin Hobb (a writer Rothfuss loves, and one who, apparently, loves Rothfuss). But Rothfuss' Kvothe is a much more appealing protagonist, to me, than Hobb's Fitz. He's a better, more human storyteller. Far more entertaining and far less whiny. To me, he seemed a lot more personal, as well, even though he takes great pains in the telling of his story to keep some distance from the reader.

The world the novel is set in seems to be very well realised, but in this first novel we really only get a taste of it. Social structures, bit of history and culture... a clear idea of how much things cost that belies an RPG background... we experience everything through Kvothe's story, and therefore the most real elements of Rothfuss' world in this novel are magic... and music! You'll understand why the last sentence actually makes sense once you read the book.

It's a massive book, there' no denying it, but it's a surprisingly quick and easy read. Or perhaps it's not all that surprising--Rothfuss' writing is extremely tight and clean, something which seems to be very uncommon in fantasy. It's not action-packed military-fantasy in any way, but every single paragraph feels like an important and natural part of the story, and of Kvothe's character-development. Those of you who've been burned by eg. Jordan in the past will find yourself very pleasantly surprised :p

In addition to the tightness and clean-ness, the writing is also... well, I can't think of a better word right now than beautiful. It's sophisticated, but without being difficult, or showy. It's sophisticated, but doesn't alienate the reader. It's always perfectly suited to the story. I didn't notice it until I realised I didn't notice it, so to speak...!

There are so many things I love about The Name of the Wind, but of all of them, what I love the most is the love-story. And I generally hate love-stories in fantasy, because they rarely do anything for me and rarely seem to fit in with the story and with the characters involved. But in this novel, the young Kvothe's love (love mixed with obsession, adulation, infatuation) for his mysterious, flighty, incomparable Denna... is among the most gripping elements of his story. The only other time when his voice is as strong and as beautiful as when he remembers Denna, is when he touches on music, his other great love (and the second thing I love about the novel). This handling of love was crucial to the wonderous nature of the novel.

I'm hungry and dinner is ready, so I'm going to finish this little review right now, with a summary for those who tl;drd the whole thing: The Name of the Wind will very probably be the best fantasy novel you've read in years. I hope many of you return to this thread in a near future to confirm this truth :)

Cheers!

-- P
Sometimes I think, sometimes I am

Offline Rel

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2007, 09:44:57 pm »
Ah, Aan was raving about this one. It's on my to read list. That means I'll probably get to it circa 2017. :)
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Offline Mordeth

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2007, 01:58:27 am »
isn't is Steve?

I know I called it Stephen once, and it got real fucking prissy.
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Offline Colin

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2007, 04:19:24 am »
This is stupid. Wind doesn't have a name you stupids.

Offline Olli

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2007, 08:20:21 am »
Quote from: Colin
This is stupid. Wind doesn't have a name you stupids.
Quote
Abroholos A squall frequent from May through August between Cabo de Sao Tome and Cabo Frio on the coast of Brazil.

Auster Same as OSTRIA

Austru A east or southeast wind in Rumania.  They are cold in winter and may be a local name for a foehn wind. (Glossary of Meteorology)

Bali wind A strong east wind at the eastern end of Java.

Barat A heavy northwest squall in Manado Bay on the north coast of the island of Celebes, prevalent from December to February.

Barber A strong wind carrying damp snow or sleet and spray that freezes upon contact with objects, especially the beard and hair.

Bayamo A violent wind blowing from the land on the south coast of Cuba, especially near the Bight of Bayamo.

Bentu de Soli An east wind on the coast of Sardinia.

Bora A cold, northerly wind blowing from the Hungarian basin into the Adriatic Sea. See also FALL WIND.

Borasco A thunderstorm or violent squall, especially in the Mediterranean.

Boreas  A ancient Greek name for north winds.  (also borras)  The term may originally have meant "wind from the mountains" and thus the present term BORA. (Glossary of Meteorology)

Brickfielder A wind from the desert in Southern Australia. Precedes the passage of a frontal zone of a low passing by. Has the same dusty character as the Harmattan. (Evert Wesker, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

Brisa, Briza 1. A northeast wind which blows on the coast of South America or an east wind which blows on Puerto Rico during the trade wind season. 2. The northeast monsoon in the Philippines.

Brisote The northeast trade wind when it is blowing stronger than usual on Cuba.

Brubu A name for a squall in the East Indies.

Bull's Eye Squall A squall forming in fair weather, characteristic of the ocean off the coast of South Africa. It is named for the peculiar appearance of the small isolated cloud marking the top of the invisible vortex of the storm.

Cape Doctor The strong southeast wind which blows on the South African coast. Also called the DOCTOR.

Caver, Kaver A gentle breeze in the Hebrides.

Chinook A type of foehn wind. Refers to the warm downslope wind in the Rocky Mountains that may occur after an intense cold spell when the temperature could rise by 20 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit in a matter of minutes. Also known as the Snow Eater. (Weather Channel Glossary)

Chubasco A violent squall with thunder and lightning, encountered during the rainy season along the west coast of Central America.

Churada A severe rain squall in the Mariana Islands during the northeast monsoon. They occur from November to April or May, especially from January through March.

Cierzo See MISTRAL.

Contrastes Winds a short distance apart blowing from opposite quadrants, frequent in the spring and fall in the western Mediterranean.

Cordonazo The "Lash of St. Francis." Name applied locally to southerly hurricane winds along the west coast of Mexico. It is associated with tropical cyclones in the southeastern North Pacific Ocean. These storms may occur from May to November, but ordinarily affect the coastal areas most severely near or after the Feast of St. Francis, October 4.

Coromell A night land breeze prevailing from November to May at La Paz, near the southern extremity of the Gulf of California.

Cyclone A severe tropical storm (i.e., winds >64 knots) in the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal.   See also Hurricane and Typhoon.  The term is also applied to closed circulations in the mid latitudes and also popularly to small scale circulations such as tornadoes.

Diablo Northern California version of Santa Ana winds. These winds occur below canyons in the East Bay hills (Diablo range) and in extreme cases can exceed 60 mph. They develop due to high pressure over Nevada and lower pressure along the central California coast. (NWS San Francisco Glossary)

Doctor 1. A cooling sea breeze in the Tropics. 2. See HARMATTAN. 3. The strong SE wind which blows on the south African coast. Usually called CAPE DOCTOR.

Elephanta A strong southerly or southeasterly wind which blows on the Malabar coast of India during the months of September and October and marks the end of the southwest monsoon.

Etesian A refreshing northerly summer wind of the Mediterranean, especially over the Aegean Sea.

Euros The Greek name for the rainy, stormy southeast wind. (Glossary of Meteorology)

Foehn A warm dry wind on the lee side of a mountain range, whose temperature is increased as the wind descends down the slope. It is created when air flows downhill from a high elevation, raising the temperature by adiabatic compression. Examples include the Chinook wind and the Santa Ana wind. Classified as a katabatic wind. (Weather Channel Glossary)

Fremantle Doctor A cooling seabreeze in Western Australia,often made note of during hot summer-time cricket matches. (Ian Staples, Australia)

Gregale A strong northeast wind of the central Mediterranean.

Haboob  A strong wind and sandstorm (or duststorm) in the northern and central Sudan, especially around Khartum, where the average number is about 24 per year. The name come from the Arabic word, "habb", meaning wind. (Bill Mork, California State Climatologist)

Harmattan The dry, dusty trade wind blowing off the Sahara Desert across the Gulf of Guinea and the Cape Verde Islands. Sometimes called the DOCTOR, because of its supposed healthful properties.

Hurricane  A severe tropical storm (i.e., winds >64 knots) in the Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Pacific.  The word is believed to originate from the Caribbean Indian storm god "Huracan".  See also Typhoon and Cyclone.

Knik Wind A strong southeast wind in the vicinity of Palmer, Alaska, most frequent in the winter.

Kona Storm A storm over the Hawaiian Islands, characterized by strong southerly or southwesterly winds and heavy rains.

Leste A hot, dry, easterly wind of the Madeira and Canary Islands.

Levanter A strong easterly wind of the Mediterranean, especially in the Strait of Gibraltar, attended by cloudy, foggy, and sometimes rainy weather especially in winter.

Levantera A persistent east wind of the Adriatic, usually accompanied by cloudy weather.

Levanto A hot southeasterly wind which blows over the Canary Islands.

Leveche A warm wind in Spain, either a foehn or a hot southerly wind in advance of a low pressure area moving from the Sahara Desert. Called a SIROCCO in other parts of the Mediterranean area.

Maestro A northwesterly wind with fine weather which blows, especially in summer, in the Adriatic. It is most frequent on the western shore. This wind is also found on the coasts of Corsica and Sardinia.

Matanuska Wind A strong, gusty, northeast wind which occasionally occurs during the winter in the vicinity of Palmer, Alaska.

Mistral A cold, dry wind blowing from the north over the northwest coast of the Mediterranean Sea, particularly over the Gulf of Lions. Also called CIERZO. See also FALL WIND.

Nashi, N'aschi A northeast wind which occurs in winter on the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf, especially near the entrance to the gulf, and also on the Makran coast. It is probably associated with an outflow from the central Asiatic anticyclone which extends over the high land of Iran. It is similar in character but less severe than the BORA.

Norte A strong cold northeasterly wind which blows in Mexico and on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico. It results from an outbreak of cold air from the north. It is the Mexican extension of a norther.

Nor'easter A northeast wind, particularly a strong wind or gale; an unusually strong storm preceded by  northeast winds off the coast of New England. Also called Northeaster. (Glossary of Weather and Climate)

Nor'wester This is a very warm wind which can blow for days on end in the province of Canterbury New Zealand. The effect is especially felt in the city of Christchurch. The wind comes in from the Tasman Sea, drys as it rises over the Southern Alps, heats as it decends, crosses the Canterbury Plains, then blows through Christchurch.. (Kerry Fitzpatrick)

Norther A cold strong northerly wind in the Southern Plains of the United States, especially in Texas, which results in a drastic drop in air temperatures.  Also called a Blue Norther.  (Glossary of Weather and Climate)

Ostria A warm southerly wind on the Bulgarian coast; considered a precursor of bad weather. (Glossary of Meteorology)

Pali A local name for strong winds which blow through the Pali Pass above Honolulu, HI.  (Michael Polansky, San Francisco)

Pampero A west or southwest wind in Southern Argentina. This wind (often violently) picks up during the passage of a cold
front of an active low passing by. (Evert Wesker, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

Papagayo A violet northeasterly fall wind on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua and Guatemala. It consists of the cold air mass of a norte which has overridden the mountains of Central America. See also TEHUANTEPECER.

Santa Ana A strong, hot, dry wind blowing out into San Pedro Channel from the southern California desert through Santa Ana Pass.

Shamal A summer northwesterly wind blowing over Iraq and the Persian Gulf, often strong during the day, but decreasing at night.

Sharki A southeasterly wind which sometimes blows in the Persian Gulf.

Sirocco A warm wind of the Mediterranean area, either a foehn or a hot southerly wind in advance of a low pressure area moving from the Sahara or Arabian deserts. Called LEVECHE in Spain.

Squamish A strong and often violent wind occurring in many of the fjords of British Columbia. Squamishes occur in those fjords oriented in a northeast-southwest or east-west direction where cold polar air can be funneled westward. They are notable in Jervis, Toba, and Bute inlets and in Dean Channel and Portland Canal. Squamishes lose their strength when free of the confining fjords and are not noticeable 15 to 20 miles offshore.

Suestado A storm with southeast gales, caused by intense cyclonic activity off the coasts of Argentina and Uruguay, which affects the southern part of the coast of Brazil in the winter.

Sumatra A squall with violent thunder, lightning, and rain, which blows at night in the Malacca Straits, especially during the southwest monsoon. It is intensified by strong mountain breezes.

Sundowner Warm downslope winds that periodically occur along a short segment of the Southern California coast in the vicinity of Santa Barbara. The name refers to their typical onset (on the populated coastal plain) in the late afternoon or early evening, though they can occur at any time of the day. In extreme cases, wind speeds can be of gale force or higher, and temperatures over the coastal plain and even at the coast itself can rise significantly above 37.8 degrees C (100 degrees F). (Warren Blier, SOO, NWS San Francisco)

Taku Wind A strong, gusty, east-northeast wind, occurring in the vicinity of Juneau, Alaska, between October and March. At the mouth of the Taku River, after which it is named, it sometimes attains hurricane force.

Tehuantepecer A violent squally wind from north or north-northeast in the Gulf of Tehuantepec (south of southern Mexico) in winter. It originates in the Gulf of Mexico as a norther which crosses the isthmus and blows through the gap between the Mexican and Guatamalan mountains. It may be felt up to 100 miles out to sea. See also PAPAGAYO.

Tramontana A northeasterly or northerly winter wind off the west coast of Italy. It is a fresh wind of the fine weather mistral type.

Typhoon A severe tropical storm (i.e., winds >64 knots) in the Western Pacific.  The word is believed to originate from the Chinese word "ty-fung".  See also Hurricane and Cyclone.

Vardar A cold fall wind blowing from the northwest down the Vardar valley in Greece to the Gulf of Salonica. It occurs when atmospheric pressure over eastern Europe is higher than over the Aegean Sea, as is often the case in winter. Also called VARDARAC.

Warm Braw A foehn wind in the Schouten Islands north of New Guinea.

White Squall A sudden, strong gust of wind coming up without warning, noted by whitecaps or white, broken water; usually seen in whirlwind form in clear weather in the tropics.

Williwaw A sudden blast of wind descending from a mountainous coast to the sea, in the Strait of Magellan or the Aleutian Islands.

Willy-willy  A tropical cyclone (with winds 33 knots or greater) in Australia, especially in the southwest. (Glossary of Weather and Climate)  More recent common usage is for dust-devils.

Zephyros The ancient Greek name for the west wind, which generally light and beneficial.  It has evolved into "zephyr" which denotes a soft gentle breeze. (Glossary of Meteorology)
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Offline Lannie

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2007, 08:54:03 am »
Whoa, that many? I only knew Sirocco and Mistral :D
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Offline Rick

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2007, 12:35:51 pm »
I call my wind whatever I want!
The simplest thing is to work with n-dimensional Minkowski spacetime.

Offline Boo!

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2007, 03:17:06 am »
Yeah, but then everyone leaves the room.  ;)


-- :mrgreen:

[edit:  BTW, Name of the Wind kicks ass...I'm eagerly awaiting the second book.]
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Offline Deus

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2007, 01:00:49 pm »
Okay, that was a pretty good read, although it ended rather abrubtly. Curious to see if more will happen in the current timeline in the next books and not just the backstory of Kvothe...
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Hong's 2nd law: "Thinking too hard about fantasy is bad"
Hong's 3rd law: "Any sufficiently widespread magic is indistinguishable from technology"

Offline Boo!

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2007, 02:59:33 am »
Well, first you have to bring us up to the point he's at now, a bartender/innkeeper with a helper who is actually one of the Fae.  What did he do after he got kicked out?  What more are we going to learn about the seven chandrian, and the dude who used to be the most glorious human who now runs the chandrian.  You know, shadow dude, what's his name.

Anyhow, what the fuck are the skrael, do they have anything with the onset of the coming war, and what in baby jesus' holy diaper is Kvothe going to do about it?

-- :mrgreen:
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Offline Deus

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2007, 12:41:47 am »
Well, yes... that was exactly my point as well... :)

Of course there's more backstory to tell, but I'm also very curious about the situation he is in now. Doesn't look like his bartender/innkeeper life is working out so well what with skrael and demon attacks and such. So I wonder if that is going to be an epic story in its own right...
Hong's 1st law:  "It's only the other people who are munchkins"
Hong's 2nd law: "Thinking too hard about fantasy is bad"
Hong's 3rd law: "Any sufficiently widespread magic is indistinguishable from technology"

Offline Hunchback

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2007, 01:17:27 am »
Is that a high-end(WoT/LotR) or low-end(Song of fire and ice) fantasy book?
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Offline Boo!

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2007, 07:12:21 am »
It's good fantasy.  For fuck's sake, just read the blurb on the dust jacket.


-- :mrgreen:
A friend is someone who pretends they like you, when they really think you should be raped by mad chimpanzees and then thrown to a pack of vicious dogs.

Offline Hunchback

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« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2007, 11:07:57 am »
i don't want to read reviews from official sources
"Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

Offline Julius

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2007, 11:30:39 pm »
...why...?
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Offline Mordeth

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« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2007, 11:47:08 pm »
a song of ice and fire.. low end?

jesus chris,t I hate you hunchback
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Offline Hunchback

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2007, 12:57:14 am »
Erm, i meant high-fantasy and low-fantasy... like, high-fantasy has LOTS of magic and elves and dwarves and dragons and magic... and low-fantasy is like SoIF, there's very (if any) magic and it's usually set in times after the great magical ones, etc...
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Offline Julius

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Offline Hunchback

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The Name of the Wind
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2007, 10:14:10 am »
^_^
"Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

Offline Boo!

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« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2008, 10:48:47 pm »
Wise Man's Fear, the sequel is out.  I haven't picked up a copy yet, but it's on my list.

-- :mrgreen:
A friend is someone who pretends they like you, when they really think you should be raped by mad chimpanzees and then thrown to a pack of vicious dogs.

Offline Jamie

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« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2008, 09:15:37 pm »
It's sitting in a stack of other Fantasy books waiting to be read.. but I did pick it up out of interest at work (bookstore) the other week. But got tied up in school work. But the general feeling is.. try it?
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Offline Boo!

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Re: The Name of the Wind
« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2008, 08:49:22 pm »
Found out the sequel was bumped from april this year to april of next year.  Bastards.

-- :D

A friend is someone who pretends they like you, when they really think you should be raped by mad chimpanzees and then thrown to a pack of vicious dogs.

Offline Cthulhu

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Re: The Name of the Wind
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2018, 11:55:30 pm »
11 years later and I still maintain that Rothfuss is a shit writer and this series is terrible.
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Offline mahiro

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Re: The Name of the Wind
« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2018, 12:22:08 am »
I just bought it.   I will find out soon enough. 
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Offline Cray

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Re: The Name of the Wind
« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2018, 08:55:33 pm »
Very good writer, suffers from grrm tendencies though. First two books are solid.
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