Author Topic: Erikson  (Read 153 times)

Offline Cthulhu

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Erikson
« on: June 22, 2008, 09:39:06 PM »
Alright, I've seen his name everywhere, and there are a few threads in here about him.  I bought Gardens of the Moon today, and I just want to check something.  Is there a planned end to this series?  If he's as good as everybody says he is, I don't want to get into a new series only to have him turn into another Jordan, making me wait two years between books, and dangling the promise of the end in front of me for more than a decade, before dying.

Before I start this, is this a finite series?  Is there a planned end to it, and is it fewer than fifteen books from now?
I remember that it rained for years / And the blood, it left a stain

Offline Deus

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Erikson
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2008, 09:43:46 PM »
Yes, there is. Book 8 is about to come out and he's busy writing book 9. The total number will be 10 and if you read a few of his books you will see that this is a guy who will not let his plot run away from him. He has tight control over it...

Also he writes faster than Jordan did, a book usually taking about 1 to 1,5 years to come out after the previous one. So if all goes well he'll be done by 2011.
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Offline Aimless

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Erikson
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2008, 09:45:27 PM »
Yes, and yes :P

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malazan_Book_of_the_Fallen#The_Malazan_Book_of_the_Fallen_Series

Erikson has been remarkably good about meeting deadlines and keeping the story on track, at least as far as I've seen.

You better count on having to re-read GotM after a few of the sequels to be able to fully appreciate it, btw!
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Offline Cthulhu

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Erikson
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2008, 09:58:32 PM »
Thanks.

Just read that article, Aimless.  I find it heartening that he's in enough control of his plot that he has the titles known already.
I remember that it rained for years / And the blood, it left a stain

Offline Aimless

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Erikson
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2008, 09:25:39 AM »
Steven Erikson, on realism:

Quote
"Your books have been described as very realistic, as very complex, and as, at times, grim. How do you see your work, and are you ever surprised by how readers react to it?

How do I see my work? Well, there's a certain amount of ruthlessness to it, but it's pretty hard in my mind to actually match the brutality of the real world — at least not in a way that anyone would want to read. To say that I am inspired by reality is a statement that verges on the blackest, most caustic comedy. What I am witness to impels my writing; failing that, I would probably descend into despair. So I write in search of humanity. It's odd, readers say that the Chain of Dogs storyline in my second novel, Deadhouse Gates, is relentless in its horror. To which I might (if I'm feeling particularly ungenerous) reply: try living in Sudan, or Zimbabwe; or how about the profligate misery of the homeless on the streets of Victoria? What I'm writing pales against the backdrop of what's really out there. Mate, trust me, you don't know relentless until you find yourself in hell with no way out. Now, I'm not in that kind of hell, but I've got eyes, and more often than not, what I see shows up in my writing eventually, sooner or later. That being said, I'd probably relent and seek to lessen the ferocity by adding that I seek to find gestures of humanity in the midst of suffering and chaos: love, friendship, the soul-saving ability to laugh. They exist, and they're precious.

The thing with fiction, the thing with fiction, is that it is structured, in a way that reality isn't. So as a creator you can strive for balance and maybe achieve a kind of satisfaction in the reader, a sense of completeness. That sense may have a tragic flavor, but I am a believer in Aristotle's assertion that tragedy is cathartic. Tragedy as an art form, that is. Real tragedy, what we see every day thanks to a categorically psychotic media, is not cathartic. It has no resolution, rarely the promise of redemption, and seems fixed like a voyeur on the negation of human virtues (never mind the two-minute feel-good shit at program's end, who are they kidding?).

So maybe fiction is the writer's engagement with reality, a dialogue offering hope in the face of a reality seemingly bent on cynically destroying it. Makes it sound plaintive and pathetic, doesn't it? Man, could be I'm just in a shitty mood.

Am I ever surprised by how readers take my stuff? Often. And baffled. Particularly in how thoroughly some of the characters are hated by the readers. Can I be perverse and take that as a measure of success?"
:)
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Offline Aimless

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Erikson
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2008, 10:23:25 AM »
Oh, and the rest of th interview: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/erikson_interview/
Sometimes I think, sometimes I am